Australia Discloses Courses Eligible For Extended Work Rights Beginning In July. - Pinoy Tambayan
Australia discloses courses eligible for extended work

Australia discloses courses eligible for extended work rights beginning in July.

As of July 1, 2018, a broader range of occupations and academic programs will be granted special post-graduation work rights in Australia. The government has said that it is allowing programs in the health, technology, education, and construction industries to apply for funding to address labor shortages in those fields.

With the new measures, which were initially announced in September of last year, international students who complete their degrees at an accredited university in the United States will have access to extended work rights for a total of four years after graduation. There will also be an increase from 40 to 48 hours per two weeks for international students’ permitted work time.

Those with a bachelor’s degree or higher will have their legal right to work extended from two to four years, those with a master’s degree or higher from three to five years, and those with a doctorate or from four to six years.

Some 226 courses in medicine and nursing, professional health, diagnostics and allied, health, education, engineering, information and communications technology, agriculture, and other fields are on the list of eligible qualifications, which will be monitored and reviewed annually.

Since institutions’ offerings vary, the Department of Education will publish a comprehensive list of ineligible courses along with their corresponding CRICOS course codes before the policy goes into effect in July.

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The government further clarified that students enrolled in eligible courses before any future

As of July 1, 2018, a broader range of occupations and academic programs will be granted special post-graduation work rights in Australia. The government has said that it is allowing programs in the health, technology, education, and construction industries to apply for funding to address labor shortages in those fields.

With the new measures, which were initially announced in September of last year, international students who complete their degrees at an accredited university in the United States will have access to extended work rights for a total of four years after graduation. There will also be an increase from 40 to 48 hours per two weeks for international students’ permitted work time.

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Those with a bachelor’s degree or higher will have their legal right to work extended from two to four years, those with a master’s degree or higher from three to five years, and those with a doctorate or higher from four to six years.

Some 226 courses in medicine and nursing, professional health, diagnostics, and allied health, education, engineering, information and communications technology, agriculture, and other fields are on the list of eligible qualifications, which will be monitored virtually.

Since institutions’ offerings vary, the Department of Education will publish a comprehensive list of ineligible courses along with their corresponding CRICOS course codes before the policy goes into effect in July.

The government further clarified that students enrolled in eligible courses before any future changes to the qualifications list would still be eligible for the extension upon graduation, even if the course in question were to be removed from the list.

Authorities have also emphasized that this new period of eligibility comes on top of the existing one to two years of additional post-study work rights in regional Australia.

Those with a bachelor’s degree or higher will have their legal right to work extended, from two to four years, those with a master’s degree or higher from three to five years, and those with a doctorate or higher from four to six years.

In a statement, the Australian government praised the “highly-skilled cohort with significant potential for this cohort to contribute to Australia’s economy and society” that is comprised of doctoral degree recipients.

The Council for International Education met in Canberra, where it was announced that visas allowing for two years of post-study work were approved.

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to the qualifications, the list would still be eligible for the extension upon graduation, even if the course in question were to be removed from the list.

Authorities have also emphasized that this new period of eligibility comes on top of the existing one to two years of additional post-study work rights for those in regional Australia.

Those with a bachelor’s degree or higher will have their legal right to work extended from two to four years, those with a master’s degree or higher from three to five years, and those with a doctorate or higher from six years.

In a statement, the Australian government praised the “highly-skilled cohort with significant potential for this cohort to contribute to Australia’s economy and society” that is comprised of doctoral degree recipients.

The Council for International Education met in Canberra, where it was announced that visas allowing for two years before work were approved.

Phil Honeywood, a member of the House of Commons, expressed his approval of the policy update on social media, writing, “pleased with 2424-hour week work rights from 1 July” along with Julian Hill MP, a member of the Council for International Education.

According to Catriona Jackson, chief executive of Universities Australia, “Australia needs more skilled workers to ease the current pressures weigh weighing your labor market and economy.”

It makes perfect sense to make it simpler for the talented international graduates whom our universities produce to put their Australian education to use in Australia’s cities and regions. She went on to say that Australia’s current skills crisis shows how critical it is to keep international students, who contribute $40,3 million to the country’s GDP.

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While many thousands of international students visit our prestigious schools each year, only sixteen percent choose to make it their permanent home. The economic and social consequences of that decision have been negative for us.

Universities Australia has been a vocal proponent of this shift, so we applaud the Albanese government for showing such bold leadership and a commitment to finding practical answers to the challenges we face in attracting and retaining qualified workers.

Particularly beneficial to the growth of Australia’s knowledge economy will be the decision to expand working rights for doctoral students.

In response to a report submitted on October 28 of last year, the government’s Post-Study Work Rights Working Group stated its approval of the 20 recommendations.

As part of the submission, it was requested that the skills priority list be used to determine occupations and that the needs of students and graduates be included in the 2023 migrant worker reform package, as well as the role of the Fair Work Ombudsman in students being made clear.

While the policy shift will be celebrated by those in the Australian international education industry, DXP Consulting principal Mary Clarke questioned whether the government should be picking and choosing which areas of study are granted the expanded privileges.

As promised at the Jobs and Skills Summit, the government is allowing international students more time to work after they finish their degrees. This is great news on the professional networking site LinkedIn.

“But … Should the government decide which areas of study will be supported? Wouldn’t that skew students’ interests and their decision to take a course? And there’s no reason to focus solely on talent shortages. The development of human capital is an issue of what?